Formation of Character Volume 5 Pt 3. Chapter 1 (17)

ÆSTHETIC CULTURE   In venturing to discuss the means of æsthetic culture, I feel that to formulate canons of taste is the same sort of thing as to draw up rules of conscience; that is, to attempt to do for other people what every one must do for himself. It may be vicious to have a flower pattern on our carpet, and correct to have … Continue reading Formation of Character Volume 5 Pt 3. Chapter 1 (17)

School Education Volume 3 Chapter 14

CHAPTER XIV A MASTER-THOUGHT           A Motto.—Some of my readers will know the Parents’ Union motto, ‘Education is an atmosphere, a discipline, a life,’ especially well in the neat diagrammatic form in which it appears on the covers of our Library books. I am told that we, as a society, are destined to live by our motto. A notable educationalist writes to me, in connection … Continue reading School Education Volume 3 Chapter 14

Formation of Character Volume 5 Pt 3. Chapter 1

TABLE-TALK             The character of the family reading will affect that of the talk; but considering how little parents see of young people once entered on their school career, it is worth while to say a few words of the table-talk which affords parents their best opportunity of influencing the opinions of the young. Every one is agreed that animated table-talk is a condition … Continue reading Formation of Character Volume 5 Pt 3. Chapter 1

School Education Volume 3 Chapter 13

CHAPTER XIII SOME UNCONSIDERED ASPECTS OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION           Authority in Religious Education.—I should like to preface my remarks on Religious Education by saying that there is not the slightest pretence that they are exhaustive. My treatment has for its object the indication of practical lines for religious education, and I very earnestly hope that the reader will find I have left out things I … Continue reading School Education Volume 3 Chapter 13

Formation of Character Volume 5 Pt 3. Chapter 1 (15)

POETRY AS A MEANS OF CULTURE             Poetry takes first rank as a means of intellectual culture. Goethe tells us that we ought to see a good picture, hear good music, and read some good poetry every day; and, certainly, a little poetry should form part of the evening lecture. “Collections” of poems are to be eschewed; but some one poet should have at … Continue reading Formation of Character Volume 5 Pt 3. Chapter 1 (15)

School Education Volume 3 Chapter 12

CHAPTER XII SOME UNCONSIDERED ASPECTS OF MORAL TRAINING           Three Foundation Principles.—Three principles which underlie the educational thought of the Union,[1] and the furtherance of which some of us have deeply at heart, are:—(a) The recognition of authority as a fundamental principle, as universal and as inevitable in the moral world as is that of gravitation in the physical; (b) the recognition of the physical … Continue reading School Education Volume 3 Chapter 12

School Education Volume 3 Chapter 11

CHAPTER XI SOME UNCONSIDERED ASPECTS OF INTELLECTUAL TRAINING           We are Law-abiding in Matters Physical and Moral.—We all recognise that we are under the reign of law so far as our bodies go. We know that ‘put your finger in the fire and it will be burnt,’ ‘sit in a draught and you will catch cold,’ ‘live a vigorous and temperate life and health will … Continue reading School Education Volume 3 Chapter 11

Formation of Character Volume 5 Pt 3. Chapter 1 (14)

THE BOOK FOR THE EVENING LECTURE             To attempt a list of books suitable for the family lecture would be as hopeless as it is unnecessary; but it is possible to discuss the principles on which the selection should be made. In the first place, to get information is not the object of the family reading, but to make the young people acquainted with … Continue reading Formation of Character Volume 5 Pt 3. Chapter 1 (14)

Formation of Character Volume 5 Pt 3. Chapter 1 (13)

READING ALOUD             There is little opportunity to give intellectual culture to the boy taken up with his school and its interests; the more reason, therefore, to make the most of that little; for when the boy leaves school, he is in a measure set; his thoughts will not readily run in the new channels. The business of the parent is to keep open … Continue reading Formation of Character Volume 5 Pt 3. Chapter 1 (13)