Home Education Volume 1 Pt 5. Ch 16

XVI.—NATURAL PHILOSOPHY             A Basis of Facts.—Of the teaching of Natural Philosophy, I will only remind the reader of what was said in an earlier chapter—that there is no part of a child’s education more important than that he should lay, by his own observation, a wide basis of facts towards scientific knowledge in the future. He must live hours daily in the open … Continue reading Home Education Volume 1 Pt 5. Ch 16

Home Education Volume 1 Pt 5. Ch 15

XV.—ARITHMETIC             Educative Value of Arithmetic.—Of all his early studies, perhaps none is more important to the child p.254 as a means of education than that of arithmetic. That he should do sums is of comparatively small importance; but the use of those functions which ‘summing’ calls into play is a great part of education; so much so, that the advocates of mathematics and … Continue reading Home Education Volume 1 Pt 5. Ch 15

Home Education Volume 1 Pt 5. Ch 14

XIV.—BIBLE LESSONS           Children enjoy the Bible.—We are apt to believe that children cannot be interested in the p.248 Bible unless its pages be watered down—turned into the slipshod English we prefer to offer them. Here is a suggestive anecdote of the childhood of Mrs Harrison, one of the pair of little Quaker maidens introduced to us in the Autobiography of Mary Howitt, the better … Continue reading Home Education Volume 1 Pt 5. Ch 14

Home Education Volume 1 Pt 5. Ch 13

XIII.—COMPOSITION           George Osborne’s Essay.—“What a prodigiously well-read and delightful person the Reverend Lawrence Veal was, George’s master! ‘He knows everything,’ Amelia said. ‘He says there is no place in the bar or the senate the Georgy may not aspire to. Look here,’ and she went to the piano-drawer and drew out a theme of George’s composition. This great effort of genius, which is still … Continue reading Home Education Volume 1 Pt 5. Ch 13

Home Education Volume 1 Pt 5. Ch 12

XII.—SPELLING AND DICTATION           Of all the mischievous exercises in which children spend their school hours, dictation, as commonly practised, is perhaps the most mischievous; and this, because people are slow to understand that there is no part of a child’s work at school which some philosophic principle does not underlie.           A Fertile Cause of Bad Spelling.—The common practice is for … Continue reading Home Education Volume 1 Pt 5. Ch 12

Home Education Volume 1 Pt 5. Ch 11

XI.—TRANSCRIPTION             Value of Transcription.—The earliest practice in writing proper for children of seven or eight should be, not letter-writing or dictation, but transcription, slow and beautiful work, for which the New Handwriting is to be preferred, though perhaps some of the more ornate characters may be omitted with advantage.           Transcription should be an introduction to spelling. Children should be encouraged … Continue reading Home Education Volume 1 Pt 5. Ch 11

Home Education Volume 1 Pt 5. Ch 10

X.—WRITING           Perfect Accomplishment.—I can only offer a few hints on the teaching of writing, though much might be said. First, let the child accomplish something perfectly in every lesson—a stroke, a pothook, a letter. Let the writing lesson be short; it should not last more than five or ten minutes. Ease in p.234 writing comes by practice; but that must be secured later. In … Continue reading Home Education Volume 1 Pt 5. Ch 10

Home Education Volume 1 Pt 5. Ch 9

IX.—THE ART OF NARRATING           Children Narrate by Nature.—Narrating is an art, like poetry-making or painting, because it is there, in every child’s mind, waiting to be discovered, and is not the result of any process of disciplinary education. A creative fiat calls it forth. ‘Let him narrate’; and the child narrates, fluently, copiously, in ordered sequence, with fit and graphic details, with a just … Continue reading Home Education Volume 1 Pt 5. Ch 9

Home Education Volume 1 Pt 5. Ch 8

VIII.—READING FOR OLDER CHILDREN           In teaching to read, as in other matters, c’est le premier pas qui coûte. The child who has been taught to read with care and deliberation until he has mastered the words of a limited vocabulary, usually does the rest for himself. The attention of his teachers should be fixed on two points—that he acquires the habit of reading, and … Continue reading Home Education Volume 1 Pt 5. Ch 8

Home Education Volume 1Pt 5. Ch 7

VII.—RECITATION ‘The Children’s Art’           On this subject I cannot do better that refer the reader to Mr Arthur Burwell’s Recitation.[1] This book purports to be a handbook for many teachers in elementary schools. I wish that it may be very largely used by such teachers, and may also become a family handbook; though many of the lessons will not be called for in educated … Continue reading Home Education Volume 1Pt 5. Ch 7