School Education Volume 3 Chapter 14

CHAPTER XIV A MASTER-THOUGHT           A Motto.—Some of my readers will know the Parents’ Union motto, ‘Education is an atmosphere, a discipline, a life,’ especially well in the neat diagrammatic form in which it appears on the covers of our Library books. I am told that we, as a society, are destined to live by our motto. A notable educationalist writes to me, in connection … Continue reading School Education Volume 3 Chapter 14

School Education Volume 3 Chapter 13

CHAPTER XIII SOME UNCONSIDERED ASPECTS OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION           Authority in Religious Education.—I should like to preface my remarks on Religious Education by saying that there is not the slightest pretence that they are exhaustive. My treatment has for its object the indication of practical lines for religious education, and I very earnestly hope that the reader will find I have left out things I … Continue reading School Education Volume 3 Chapter 13

School Education Volume 3 Chapter 12

CHAPTER XII SOME UNCONSIDERED ASPECTS OF MORAL TRAINING           Three Foundation Principles.—Three principles which underlie the educational thought of the Union,[1] and the furtherance of which some of us have deeply at heart, are:—(a) The recognition of authority as a fundamental principle, as universal and as inevitable in the moral world as is that of gravitation in the physical; (b) the recognition of the physical … Continue reading School Education Volume 3 Chapter 12

School Education Volume 3 Chapter 11

CHAPTER XI SOME UNCONSIDERED ASPECTS OF INTELLECTUAL TRAINING           We are Law-abiding in Matters Physical and Moral.—We all recognise that we are under the reign of law so far as our bodies go. We know that ‘put your finger in the fire and it will be burnt,’ ‘sit in a draught and you will catch cold,’ ‘live a vigorous and temperate life and health will … Continue reading School Education Volume 3 Chapter 11

School Education Volume 3 Chapter 10

CHAPTER X SOME UNCONSIDERED ASPECTS OF PHYSICAL TRAINING PERHAPS never since the days of the Olympian games has more attention been paid to physical culture than it receives in England to-day. But possibly this physical cult suffers from the want of unity and sanctity of purpose which nullifies to a considerable extent most of our educational efforts.           Does our Physical Culture make Heroes?—We want … Continue reading School Education Volume 3 Chapter 10

School Education Volume 3 Chapter 9

CHAPTER IX A GREAT EDUCATIONALIST (A REVIEW)           We look to Germany for Educational Reform.—We in England require, every now and then, to pull ourselves together, and to ask what they are doing on the Continent in the way of education. We still hark back to the older German educational reformers. We may not know much of Comenius, Basedow, Ratich; we do know something of … Continue reading School Education Volume 3 Chapter 9

School Education Volume 3 Chapter 8

CHAPTER VIII CERTAIN RELATIONS PROPER TO A CHILD           GEOLOGY, mineralogy, physical geography, botany, natural history, biology, astronomy—the whole circle of the sciences is, as it were, set with gates ajar in order that a child may go forth furnished, not with scientific knowledge, but with, what Huxley calls, common information, so that he may feel for objects on the earth and in the heavens … Continue reading School Education Volume 3 Chapter 8

School Education Volume 3 Chapter 7

CHAPTER VII AN ADEQUATE THEORY OF EDUCATION           A Human Being.—I have laid before the reader, as a working hypothesis,—that man is homogeneous, a spiritual being invested with a body—capable of responding to spiritual impulses, the organ by which he expresses himself, the vehicle by which he receives impressions, and the medium by which he establishes relations with what we call the material world;—that will, … Continue reading School Education Volume 3 Chapter 7

School Education Volume 3 Chapter 6

VI SOME EDUCATIONAL THEORIES EXAMINED             Theories of Pestalozzi and Froebel.—It  is refreshing to turn to that school of German educational thought which has produced the two great apostles, Pestalozzi and Froebel. What we may call the enthusiasm of childhood, joyous teaching, loving and lovable teachers and happy school hours for the little people, are among the general gains from this source. To look … Continue reading School Education Volume 3 Chapter 6